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Best oklahoma no-till drill?
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versatile875
Posted 10/25/2009 8:36 PM (#3073)
Subject: Best oklahoma no-till drill?




Posts: 9
0
Location: midwestern oklahoma
trying to decide which no-till drill to buy.... rented a 1590 jd worked really well but to small for amount of acres. we have old versatile tractors with open-center hydralics so an air-seeder is out of the question. also concernd about the jd being high maintanance. we have lots of terraces and ground can be very hard. have been looking at sunflower drills and crustbuster allplant. wondering if anybody had any ideas. probibly looking for around a 30ft model and must be able to do conventianal seeding as well. mostly for wheat but might be used for other crops.
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clayton58
Posted 10/25/2009 9:26 PM (#3074 - in reply to #3073)
Subject: RE: Best oklahoma no-till drill?




Posts: 125
10025
Lots of people seem to think the JD drills are high maintenance, but I have found that that is not the case. If an air seeder is not in the picture, you could pull a couple 1590's. I don't remember who, but I know I've heard of hitches built specifically for the JD box drills.
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versatile875
Posted 10/25/2009 10:28 PM (#3075 - in reply to #3073)
Subject: Re: Best oklahoma no-till drill?




Posts: 9
0
Location: midwestern oklahoma
we went and looked at a set of 750's on a houlke hitch. it looks like both the hitch and the drills take quite a beating. that was our first idea for a no till drill. but are still very concerned about our terraces. we really liked the performance of the 1590 but a decent set of them are very expensive. and hard to find in our area and in good condition. i wish jd made a 30 foot folding drill with the 90 series opener!!! but as for the folding drills, i like the look of the crustbuster, but my father likes the look of the sunflower. nobody in our area has either for their no till operation to compare performance.
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gmaskus
Posted 10/26/2009 10:46 AM (#3077 - in reply to #3073)
Subject: RE: Best oklahoma no-till drill?




Posts: 16
0
Location: East Central Colorado
Hard to tell anyone what is best for their operation but here is my $0.02. On the double disk vs. JD single disk openers I think the single biggest difference is where the depth gauging is done. With the gauge wheel on the JD running right beside the opener you get much more consistent depth control vs. the double disk drills using the press wheel for gauging. I don't have a lot of experience with the double disk drills but from what I have seen in varying field conditions you will have seed planted at 2-3" in places and some nearly on the top in others. That said you also mentioned conventional seeding -- in that environment the double disk drills will probably be better because that is what they were originally designed for. If your conventional has been recently tilled then the difference would probably be even bigger. If the conventional could be left untilled the last operation the JD would probably do a better job than in freshly tilled.

As for Sunflower vs. Crustbuster I like the CB all plant opener a little better especially for harder conditions. The leading edge design with a slightly larger disk does a better job of cutting IMHO. Overall I think the engineering on the Sunflower would get the nod over the CB but I also like the CB wobble slot seed metering and the newer ones with the transmission for setting the speed of the drive shaft makes a pretty decent system. I have a neighbor that is pretty particular about everything that recently traded a 3-4 yr. old Sunflower for a new CB all plant.

One last thought -- there used to be a company -- Atom Jet industries I think, that made a hydraulic system for Versatiles that would allow you to run an air seeder with them -- that would allow you to go to an easily folding drill.
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Todd in sc KS
Posted 10/26/2009 6:47 PM (#3078 - in reply to #3077)
Subject: RE: Best oklahoma no-till drill?


10010010025
Location: Harper County and Reno County, KS
We have a 4740, and for the most part we are very happy with it. It is not ideal, but I've also had issues with a 750 and 1590 that we had rented in the past. I have wondered about the Sunflower drills as well, but I think I would have to give the nod to CrustBuster. There are ways to get around most of the problems associated with either type of opener, but I actually had problems with depth control on the JD drills, and it was because the wheel was beside the blade as it went over a pile of residue, where having it behind the opener would've kept the depth more even. Behind can present problems when going over old rows sometimes going after crops like corn or something in ridge till. But if you go with the rows, or at a slight angle, it isn't much of an issue if at all.

Todd
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versatile875
Posted 10/26/2009 9:39 PM (#3079 - in reply to #3073)
Subject: Re: Best oklahoma no-till drill?




Posts: 9
0
Location: midwestern oklahoma
are you running 7.5 spacing? what kindof fertilizer system are you using? what size of tractor are you pulling it with? there are many types of press wheel options and not sure what kind does what by there literature. also people have said somthing about weight brackets......well another reason i like the crustbuster idea better is because the wheels arn't on the outside of the box like the sunflower....
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gmaskus
Posted 10/27/2009 10:28 AM (#3082 - in reply to #3078)
Subject: RE: Best oklahoma no-till drill?




Posts: 16
0
Location: East Central Colorado
I guess the problems I have seen "here" have been mostly in high yielding areas of wheat stubble (80-100bu/ac) in the low lying areas of the field that are always wet. The double disk drills want to sink out of sight in that and then the openers will also start sliding in that environment and cause the drill to plug. Same thing in corn residue in those same type areas of the fields where the corn yields were 150+. As for wheat stubble it might be better with stripper stubble but if it goes flat it would probably not be any better either. My experience also lies with the 3400 series all plant but I don't think there is a significant difference in the opener design, just the frame. Given all of that if I were to chose a double disk drill it would be a crustbuster. I noticed that Landoll has a new notill drill out and personally I don't like the design of that drill at all. The openers are on long linkages that are not parallel links which I would think on a double disk drill would cause all kinds of problems in terraces. I guess I would also have to preface most of my comments with the fact that we don't have terraces here, only some rolling ground with bottoms that can be problems like I mentioned above.

Not sure if it would have made any difference on the drills that you have rented in the past but there are narrow gauge wheel options now that might alleviate some of the depth control problems in the JD's. Those however, would also by definition make their performance in conventional till conditions poorer.

Edited by gmaskus 10/27/2009 10:30 AM
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Todd in sc KS
Posted 10/27/2009 6:15 PM (#3083 - in reply to #3082)
Subject: RE: Best oklahoma no-till drill?


10010010025
Location: Harper County and Reno County, KS
Yes, we have lots of terraces, that the depth of frame on the single disk drills out there can make it rather difficult. That to can be minimized as well by taking the terraces at an angle. I will agree that the drills can tend to sink in wet areas, but I've had that same problem to some extent with the single disk openers. We don't have the 80-100 bu. wheat to worry about that problem. Corn can sometimes get rather heavy though. I would love to find the perfect drill, maybe someday soon it will be built.


Todd
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tmac
Posted 11/1/2009 11:28 PM (#3099 - in reply to #3083)
Subject: RE: Best oklahoma no-till drill?




Posts: 72
2525
Location: Wichita County Texas
I have never ran a no-till box drill. When we left conventional tillage and went to no-till we purchased an 1890 seeder. However, I have a couple of friends that were running no-till box drills. One was a great plains with coulters and the other I don't know the brand. Both of those guys purchased used 1890 seeders and remarked that they were doing a much better job of seeding than they had in the past. Yes, there is maintenance and it can be expensive, the good stuff usually is.
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Alleytat
Posted 12/17/2009 10:32 PM (#3150 - in reply to #3073)
Subject: RE: Best oklahoma no-till drill?




Posts: 41
25
Location: South Harper County Kansas
Ive got a Greatplains 2n-2410 notill box double disk drill with the turbocoulters on the front... My assement has been fair with some modifications... my drill came with slick implement wheeels which got me stuck every time a bird flew over... I upgraded to wider aftermarket wheels away from the struts and skid steer tires.. problem solved . I like the drill because it will cut through about any heavy residue. Its is a very heavy drill... folds up into a neat little package for roading. My JD neighbors say mine will go where their single disk can get clogged up in heavy residue.

It has liquid fertilizer added on and Ive put keton firmers. Mixed reviews of keeton design. Any wobble of the disk will wear into the keeton and cut the fertilizer tube.. just should have run the tube straight down the center than route along the side where the disk can reach it.
I dont like the press wheels... fat tire with a ridge in the middle.. too much money right now to change to a pinch type double press wheel (something like $225 each to change). Maintenance issues has been fair... and the turbo coulters wore about what I expected. Theres a switch that cost a fricking $200 dollars that Ive had to replace twice that turns off the gears when the drill is raised. I like the electric clutches to run either or both boxes..The seed plugs that I had to order to make it plant on 15inch centers were an expensive total disappointment to their design because they set below the holes which has to be /checked/swept several times when the box gets low on seed.. would have been so easy to make them higher and slanted so they just drain into each hole on their own
I do like the easy change of seed rates and coulter depth control and seed depth control compared to what Ive seen of the the Sunflower allplant. Im sure I paid for that luxury... This drill has a bunch of hydrolic cylinders and switches to make it fold up... Customer service has been good as well as parts availablity. Mine is on 7.5 rows and Ive planted everything from wheat, soy,milo cowpeas, sesame over 6000 acres
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